George A. Sprecace M.D., J.D., F.A.C.P. and Allergy Associates of New London, P.C.
www.asthma-drsprecace.com

WHAT'S RIGHT WITH THE CATHOLIC CHURCH #138



ZENIT

The world seen from Rome

Daily dispatch - April 27, 2014

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VATICAN DOSSIER

·         Text of Papal Messages to Poles and People of Bergamo
Francis Sent Messages Ahead of Canonization of John XXIII and John Paul II

·         John Paul II, John XXII Canonized
Pope Francis: New Saints Were Unafraid of Gazing Upon Wounds of Christ

·         Michael Novak Recalls the Good Humoured John XXIII and the Polish Pontiff Who Called Him a Friend
Tells ZENIT Why Joint Canonization Made Sense

REGINA CAELI

·         On the Canonizations of Sts. John XXIII and John Paul II
"We turn in prayer to the Virgin Mary, whom St. John XXIII and St. John Paul II loved like her true sons"

Rome Reports

·         Pilgrims share their personal stories on the Church's two new saints (Video)
Hundreds of flags, custom made shirts and banners show the affection these pilgrims feel for the two Popes. St. Peter's Square became the crossing point for people from all nationalities and backgrounds

·         Pope Francis greets Benedict XVI before start of canonization ceremony (Video)
Pope Francis walked into St. Peter's Square at 10.00 to start of the canonization ceremony. He was joined by cardinals who will concelebrate Mass with him following the canonization

·         Pope's Canonization Mass: John Paul II and John XXIII were brave and hopeful, even amid challenges (Video)
It was a unique day to say the least. The canonization of John Paul II and John XXIII will forever be recorded in the history of the Catholic Church

DOCUMENTS

·         Pope Francis' Homily at Canonization Mass of Sts. John XXIII and John Paul II
"May these two new saints and shepherds of Gods people intercede for the Church"


VATICAN DOSSIER


Text of Papal Messages to Poles and People of Bergamo
Francis Sent Messages Ahead of Canonization of John XXIII and John Paul II

VATICAN CITY, April 27, 2014 (Zenit.org) - Text of Pope Francis' Video Message to the Poles on Occasion of Canonization of John Paul II: 

Dear Fellow Countrymen of Blessed John Paul II!

The canonization is now close of the great man and great Pope, who has passed into history with the name John Paul II. I am happy to have been called to proclaim his sanctity on next Sunday of the Divine Mercy, at the end of the Easter Octave. I am grateful to John Paul II, as are all the members of the People of God, for his tireless service, his spiritual leadership, for having introduced the Church in the third millennium of the faith and for his extraordinary witness of holiness. 

Three years ago, on the day of the Beatification of his Predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI noted rightly that what John Paul II asked all was not to be afraid to open wide the doors to Christ. He, himself, did so first: “He opened to Christ the society, the culture, the political and economic systems, intervening with the strength of a giant -- strength that came to him from God -- a tendency which could seem irreversible. With his witness of faith, of love and of apostolic courage, accompanied by a great human drive, this exemplary son of the Polish nation helped Christians worldwide not to be afraid to call themselves Christians, to belong to the Church, to speak of the Gospel. In a word, he helped us not to be afraid of the truth, because the truth is the guarantee of freedom” (Homily, May 1, 2011). I identify fully with these words of Pope Benedict XVI. 

We all know that, before going on the roads of the world, Karol Wojtyla grew up to the service of Christ and of the Church in his homeland, Poland. His heart was formed there, a heart which then was dilated to the universal dimension, first by participating in Vatican Council II and, above all, after October 16 of 1978, so that in it all nations, languages and cultures could find a place. John Paul II made himself everything to everyone. 

I thank the Polish people and the Church in Poland for the gift of John Paul II. We have all been enriched by this gift. John Paul II continues to inspire us. We are inspired by his words, his writings, his gestures, his style of service. We are inspired by his suffering lived with heroic hope. We are inspired by his total entrustment to Christ, Redeemer of man, and to the Mother of God. 

During the recent visit ad limina Apostolorum of the Polish Bishops, I stressed that the Church in Poland continues to have great capacity of faith, of prayer, of charity and of Christian practice. I also highlighted the pastoral challenges, such as the family, young people, the poor and vocations to the priesthood and to consecrated life. I hope that John Paul II’s canonization, and also John XXIII’s, will give a new impulse to the daily and perseverant work of the Church in your homeland. I am delighted by the fact that, God willing, in two years’ time I will visit your country for the first time, on the occasion of the World Youth Day.

I invite all to live profoundly the canonization of Blessed John Paul II and of Blessed John XXIII. Some of you will come to Rome but, thanks to the mass media, very many of you will be able to participate in this great event. Therefore, I wish already today to thank all the journalists of the press, radio and television for their service to the canonization of next Sunday. 

I greet all of John Paul II’s fellow countrymen, also those who do not belong to the Catholic Church. I carry all in my heart. May God bless you all!

[Original text: Italian]

[Translation by ZENIT]

* * *

Following is a translation of the Message that Pope Francis sent to the people of Bergamo, on the occasion of the Canonization of their fellow countryman, Blessed John XXIII.

Dear Friends of Bergamo, 

As the day of the canonization of Blessed John XXIII draws closer, I felt the desire to send this greeting to your Bishop Francesco, to the priests, the men and women religious, the lay faithful of the Diocese of Bergamo, but also to those who do not belong to the Church and to the entire community of Bergamo. 

I know how much you love Pope John, and how much he loved his land. Since the day of his election to the Pontificate, the name of Bergamo and of Sotto il Monte have become familiar throughout the world and still today, more than fifty years later, they are associated to his smiling face and his father’s tenderness. 

I invite you to thank the Lord for the great gift that his sanctity was for the universal Church and I encourage you to keep the memory of the land in which it germinated: a land made of profound faith lived in the day-to-day of poor but united families by the love of the Lord, of a community able to share in simplicity. 

Certainly, since then the world has changed, and new also are the challenges for the mission of the Christian community. However, that inheritance can still inspire today a Church called to live the sweet and comforting joy of evangelizing, of being a companion on the path of every man, “fountain of the village” from which all can draw the fresh water of the Gospel. The renewal desired by the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council has opened the way, and it is a special joy that Pope Roncalli’s canonization takes place together with that of Blessed John Paul II, who carried this renewal forward in his long pontificate. 

I am certain that the civil society also will always be able to find inspiration in the life of the Pope of Bergamo and in the environment that generated him, seeking new ways, adapted to the times, to build a coexistence based on the everlasting values of fraternity and solidarity.

Dear brothers and sisters, I entrust this message of mine to the “Echo of Bergamo,” of which the young priest Don Angelo Roncalli was an esteemed collaborator. When his ministry then took him far away, he always received the pages of the “Echo,” the voice and the call of his land. I ask you to pray for me, while assuring you of my remembrance and prayer for you all, in particular for those who are suffering, for the sick – recalling the citizen Hospital that you dedicated to Pope John – and for the diocesan Seminary, so dear to his heart. On the imminence of the Easter celebrations, I send all the Apostolic Blessing.

FRANCISCUS

[Original text: Italian]

[Translation by ZENIT]

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John Paul II, John XXII Canonized
Pope Francis: New Saints Were Unafraid of Gazing Upon Wounds of Christ

By Ann Schneible, Deborah Castellano Lubov

VATICAN CITY, April 27, 2014 (Zenit.org) - On Divine Mercy Sunday, the Church celebrated the canonization John XXIII and John Paul II, two of the most influential figures of the 20th century.

Two tapestries, each bearing the image of the newly-declared saints, hung from the façade of Saint Peter’s basilica, overlooking the hundreds of thousands of people who had filled Saint Peter’s Square for the occasion. Thousands more poured into the streets around the Vatican, took part in the Mass by watching it on giant screens. Most notable was the vast number of pilgrims from Poland who have travelled to Rome – by bus, plane, and even on foot – to witness the canonization of the first Polish pope.

One of the special guests attending the Mass was Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI who himself had beatified John Paul II, his predecessor and friend.

Opening his homily, Pope Francis noted that the canonizations coincide with Divine Mercy Sunday, a feast instituted by John Paul II. To mark this feast, the Holy Father reflected on “the glorious wounds of the risen Jesus”.

In the Gospel reading for the day, he spoke of how Christ had already appeared to the Apostles, with the exception of Thomas, who said he would not believe Jesus had Risen until he placed his finger in His wounds. It was not until Jesus appeared to them again that he believed, proclaiming “My Lord and my God!" (Jn 20:28).

“The wounds of Jesus are a scandal, a stumbling block for faith, yet they are also the test of faith,” the Holy Father said. “That is why on the body of the risen Christ the wounds never pass away: they remain, for those wounds are the enduring sign of God’s love for us. They areessential for believing in God. Not for believing that God exists, but for believing that God is love, mercy and faithfulness.”

John XXIII and John Paul II, however, were men who “were not afraid to look upon the wounds of Jesus, to touch his torn hands and his pierced side. They were not ashamed of the flesh of Christ, they were not scandalized by him, by his cross,” seeing Jesus in all those who suffer and struggle.

These courageous men, he said, were “filled with the parrhesia of the Holy Spirit,” bearing “witness before the Church and the world to God’s goodness and mercy.”

John XXIII and John Paul II, he said, were “priests, bishops and popes of the twentieth century”: they “lived through the tragic events of that century, but they were not overwhelmed by them. For them, God was more powerful; faith was more powerful – faith in Jesus Christ the Redeemer of man and the Lord of history; the mercy of God, shown by those five wounds, was more powerful; and more powerful too was the closeness of Mary our Mother”.

In their willingness to look “upon the wounds of Christ” and bear “witness to his mercy,” there dwelt within them “a living hope and an indescribable and glorious joy” (1 Pet 1:3,8).

Pope Francis also recalled how “John XXIII and John Paul II cooperated with the Holy Spirit in renewing and updating the Church in keeping with her pristine features, those features which the saints have given her throughout the centuries”.

“In convening the Council, John XXIII showed an exquisite openness to the Holy Spirit. He let himself be led and he was for the Church a pastor, a servant-leader. This was his great service to the Church”.

For his part, the Holy Father continued, “John Paul II was the pope of the family,” recalling the upcoming Synod on the family.  “From his place in heaven,” he said, “he guides and sustains” in the journey toward the Synod.

Pope Francis called on the faithful to look to these saints to learn how “not to be scandalized by the wounds of Christ and to enter ever more deeply into the mystery of divine mercy, which always hopes and always forgives, because it always loves”.

In his short Regina Caeli address following Mass, the Pope greeted all those who had traveled to Rome for the event, and thanked all those who had contributed to its success. He made special mention of those pilgrims from Bergamo and Krakow – the cities where John XXIII and John Paul II came from, respectively. “You honor the memory of the two holy Popes, faithfully following their teachings”.

He also welcomed those representing the many countries around the world, who had come to “give tribute to the two pontiffs who had contributed in an indelible way to the development of peoples, and to peace.

One of the concelebrants for Sunday’s Mass was former archbishop of Westminster, Cardinal Cormac-Murphy O’Connor. He was a young priest when Angelo Roncalli was elected in 1958, he told ZENIT, having been ordained just one year previous. “I well remember his election and thinking: gosh, he’s quite old, he’s 77. I didn’t think he set the world on fire. But then, within a very short amount of time, he became “Good Pope John.” His humanity, his humor, his simplicity, endeared him to everybody.”

“I remember we were going into a prison here in Rome, and one of the prisoners said: Holy Father, I’m a murderer. Will God ever forgive me? You know what he did? He went up and embraced him”.

Many changes were instituted following the Second Vatican Council, which was initiated by John XXIII, including the celebration of Mass in the vernacular, as well as a greater emphasis on Scripture. “For me personally,” said the cardinal, “the new emphasis on ecumenism was something quite dramatically new, and it affected me not only then but right through my life as a priest and bishop”.

Reflecting back to the election of John Paul II, Cardinal Murphy-O’Connor recalled that “from the very beginning one could see he was a leader”.

One of the highlights of John Paul II’s pontificate, he said, was his 1982 visit to Britain which he described as “very dramatic.”

“It was just the time of the Falklands Malvinas war. But he was determined to come. It was not just a success but it was a marvelous week because, for the first time, English and Scottish and Welsh people saw the Catholic community. Not just the Pope, but the Catholic community gathered around him.

“The most moving thing about Pope John Paul was the last five years of illness, his suffering, which he bore so bravely,” he said, recalling his last meeting with the Holy Father a couple years before his death.

Speaking in Italian, he said:“I remember asking him when he was going to beatify John Henry Newman. ‘Ah,’ he said, ‘you need a miracle! I said, ‘well, the English aren’t very good at miracles. We don’t bully God enough like the Italians.’” Cardinal Newman has since been beatified.

“It’s nice to think, as I reflect on his long and eventful life, that the main thing about him is that he was a holy man,” he said.

In the hours leading up to Sunday’s canonization, thousands of pilgrims gathered along the streets surrounding the Vatican for a chance to make it into the Square.

Despite feeling "shoved" and "squeezed," the smiling pilgrims said that "nothing could contain their joy."

Representing John Paul's Poland, pilgrims Magdalena Krefto and Jerzy Tarnowski were grateful to have secured an elevated place to stand and see. They told ZENIT about the pontiff of Krakow who "delivered a message of love."

"We have a strong attachment to John Paul. Our affection and love for him has brought us to Rome both for the beatification and now for the canonization," said Krefto, who added "how lovely it is to be back in the lovely and beautiful eternal city."

"For the people of Poland it's a very special time as he was a father to our country," she said, noting the "huge presence" of Polish pilgrims.

Mr. Tarnowski added: "Through his extensive travels and visits, his words touched and taught people around the globe."

Having flown ten hours from Nigeria for the event, Monica Ishioma told ZENIT John Paul II was "a lovely father."

"To be a witness to the two blesseds becoming saints is an extraordinary moment."  

Recalling his two visits to Nigeria, she said he "preached love and forgiveness" and "touched the hearts of the Nigerian people," particularly through his visit for the canonization of Nigerian Blessed Tansi. Visiting his village, she said, he "delivered a love message, preaching love and forgiveness." 

"It is important to be here,” she said, “because I want to witness the sainthood of both beloved popes and to experience the beautiful city of Rome”.

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Michael Novak Recalls the Good Humoured John XXIII and the Polish Pontiff Who Called Him a Friend
Tells ZENIT Why Joint Canonization Made Sense

By Deborah Castellano Lubov

VATICAN CITY, April 27, 2014 (Zenit.org) - Michael Novak, former ambassador to the U.N. Commission on Human Rights, theologian, and author of some 30 books, including "The Open Church" and "Writing from Left to Right: My Journey from Liberal to Conservative" spoke with ZENIT in Rome days before this weekend's canonization.

An eyewitness to Vatican II, who was both given one of the last wedding blessings by John XXIII and who was publicly called a friend by John Paul II, Novak shared with ZENIT his thoughts about the two popes and the canonization.

ZENIT: What is the reason behind having a joint canonization? It's said that Poles are unhappy with JPII being canonized on the same day as John XXIII.

Novak: The linking of the popes makes better sense of them both, than one by one.

At the end of John XXIII's time as pope, his work was left very undone. Some were even speculating about a Vatican III. Once Benedict XVI was asked: "What's the full meaning of Vatican II?" He responded: "We won't know, as the fruits of the council take time to develop."

This is very true and is evidenced by the fact that no other country or great organization has had a re-enactment of the council, in the sense that they took the initiative to reinvent themselves. We cannot name another institution that is or has effectively done this in the same way that the Catholic Church did through Vatican II.

The questions raised by the decisions reached by the decrees were incredibly far reaching and forward looking. It's true that 50 years were needed to come to a common understanding of what happened.

ZENIT: Many say the joint canonization could be seen as a sign of continuity between the Popes and the council. Could you explain your view on this?

Novak: Yes, as I said in my book "The Open Church," John XXIII 'opened the windows of the Church' when he announced there would be a Second Vatican Council. He knew better than to consult with the Roman Curia, which had been described in this way: "Popes come and go, but the Curia lives forever." He just announced the Church needed this council and will be having it, whether the Curia liked it or not.

Vatican II was a tremendous event which advanced the Council of Trent. It announced a new era of the Church which, after John Paul II, Benedict XVI was about to build on in a very scholarly way and Francis would build on in a very populist way.

ZENIT: In what ways did John Paul II himself carry out the fruits of the council?

Novak: John Paul II took the initiatives of John XXIII and 'rounded them out,' completing them and making them international. By 'rounded out,' I mean he did something unimaginable in the way he carried out the council's decrees. No one had any idea what he was thinking. 

If someone would have predicted that the wall would come down, they would have locked him up. This is a testament to Wojtyla who, effectively did the impossible, in crumbling communism, in a roughly 11 year time frame.

He changed the contours of the world, traveling, more than any pope ever had. He showed the Church structure is not a pyramid, it's concentric rings, which were visible during his travels, at which he would be on an altar surrounded by bishops of the region and hemisphere. John Paul introduced this to the world.

ZENIT: Tell us about the "The Open Church." With your personal account of being present at Vatican II, could you give some insight to the persons who would like to know more about John XXIII?

Novak: John XXIII was so wonderful. He was known as the smiling pope. He was very easy-going, kind, warm, and friendly. He enjoyed a good joke and laughed often. He had that personal touch that people see in and love about Pope Francis today. He was not all puffed up about himself.

ZENIT: Can you please give an example of this humorous and playful side of the Italian pontiff?

Novak: Yes, once, when walking with a journalist in the Vatican gardens, he was asked whether he knew how many people worked at the Vatican. He joked saying, "about half."

ZENIT: How else were John XXIII and Pope Francis similar?

Novak: They were both pastors of the Church. They possessed that warmth. They fall into the category of someone with whom you would like to have a coffee or cigar with.

John XXIII had "opened the windows of the Church" with Vatican II and brought an "aggiornamento," meaning it brought the Church to today. Yet, he was aware, like how Francis is, that sometimes there are 'winds.' Not everything that comes in through the open window is good. There are noxious fumes. Likewise, not everything of today is good. 

ZENIT: What aspect of John XXIII and John Paul II's relationship is important to this canonization?

Novak: The council that John XXIII proposed brought the Church together and nailed down clear, positive statements of faith built around prayers of the Church. This allowed for the evangelization, which John Paul II brought to fruition.

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REGINA CAELI


On the Canonizations of Sts. John XXIII and John Paul II
"We turn in prayer to the Virgin Mary, whom St. John XXIII and St. John Paul II loved like her true sons"

VATICAN CITY, April 27, 2014 (Zenit.org) - Here is the translation of the Holy Father's address prior to the recitation of the Regina Coeli at the conclusion of the Canonization Mass of Sts. John XXIII and John Paul II.

* * *

Dear brothers and sisters,

Before concluding this feast of faith I would like to greet and thank all of you!

I thank the cardinals and the numerous bishops and priests of every part of the world.

My gratitude goes out to official delegations from many countries, who have come to pay homage to 2 pontiffs, who contributed in a permanent way to the cause of the development of peoples and to peace. A special thanks to the Italian officials for their precious collaboration.

With great affection I greet the pilgrims of the Diocese of Bergamo and of Krakow! My dear friends, honor the memory of the 2 popes by faithfully following their teachings.

I am grateful to all of those who with great generosity prepared these memorable days: he Diocese of Rome with Cardinal Vallini, the municipality of Rome with the Mayor Ignazio Marino, the law enforcement agencies and the various other organizations, associations and the numerous volunteers. Thank you everyone!

My greeting goes out to all the pilgrims here in St. Peter’s Square, on the nearby streets and in other places in Rome; and to those who are joining us by radio and television; and I thank the media directors and workers, who have given so many people the possibility of participating. A special greeting goes out to the sick and the elderly toward whom the new saints were especially close.

And now we turn in prayer to the Virgin Mary, whom St. John XXIII and St. John Paul II loved like her true sons.

[Translation by Joseph Trabbic]

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Rome Reports


Pilgrims share their personal stories on the Church's two new saints (Video)
Hundreds of flags, custom made shirts and banners show the affection these pilgrims feel for the two Popes. St. Peter's Square became the crossing point for people from all nationalities and backgrounds

By Rome Reports

ROME, April 27, 2014 (Zenit.org) - To view the video click here.

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Pope Francis greets Benedict XVI before start of canonization ceremony (Video)
Pope Francis walked into St. Peter's Square at 10.00 to start of the canonization ceremony. He was joined by cardinals who will concelebrate Mass with him following the canonization

By Rome Reports

ROME, April 27, 2014 (Zenit.org) - To view the video click here.

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Pope's Canonization Mass: John Paul II and John XXIII were brave and hopeful, even amid challenges (Video)
It was a unique day to say the least. The canonization of John Paul II and John XXIII will forever be recorded in the history of the Catholic Church

By Rome Reports

ROME, April 27, 2014 (Zenit.org) - To view the video click here.

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DOCUMENTS


Pope Francis' Homily at Canonization Mass of Sts. John XXIII and John Paul II
"May these two new saints and shepherds of Gods people intercede for the Church"

VATICAN CITY, April 27, 2014 (Zenit.org) - Here is the translation of the Pope's homily at the Canonization Mass of Sts. John XXIII and John Paul II today in St. Peter's Square.

* * *

At the heart of this Sunday, which concludes the Octave of Easter and which John Paul II wished to dedicate to Divine Mercy, are the glorious wounds of the risen Jesus.

He had already shown those wounds when he first appeared to the Apostles on the very evening of that day following the Sabbath, the day of the resurrection. But Thomas was not there that evening, and when the others told him that they had seen the Lord, he replied that unless he himself saw and touched those wounds, he would not believe. A week later, Jesus appeared once more to the disciples gathered in the Upper Room, and Thomas was present; Jesus turned to him and told him to touch his wounds. Whereupon that man, so straightforward and accustomed to testing everything personally, knelt before Jesus with the words: "My Lord and my God!" (Jn 20:28).

The wounds of Jesus are a scandal, a stumbling block for faith, yet they are also the test of faith. That is why on the body of the risen Christ the wounds never pass away: they remain, for those wounds are the enduring sign of God’s love for us. They are essential for believing in God. Not for believing that God exists, but for believing that God is love, mercy and faithfulness. Saint Peter, quoting Isaiah, writes to Christians: "by his wounds you have been healed" (1 Pet 2:24, cf. Is 53:5).

Saint John XXIII and Saint John Paul II were not afraid to look upon the wounds of Jesus, to touch his torn hands and his pierced side. They were not ashamed of the flesh of Christ, they were not scandalized by him, by his cross; they did not despise the flesh of their brother (cf. Is 58:7), because they saw Jesus in every person who suffers and struggles. These were two men of courage, filled with the parrhesia of the Holy Spirit, and they bore witness before the Church and the world to God’s goodness and mercy.

They were priests, bishops and popes of the twentieth century. They lived through the tragic events of that century, but they were not overwhelmed by them. For them, God was more powerful; faith was more powerful – faith in Jesus Christ the Redeemer of man and the Lord of history; the mercy of God, shown by those five wounds, was more powerful; and more powerful too was the closeness of Mary our Mother.

In these two men, who looked upon the wounds of Christ and bore witness to his mercy, there dwelt a living hope and anindescribable and glorious joy (1 Pet 1:3,8). The hope and the joy which the risen Christ bestows on his disciples, the hope and the joy which nothing and no one can take from them. The hope and joy of Easter, forged in the crucible of self-denial, self-emptying, utter identification with sinners, even to the point of disgust at the bitterness of that chalice. Such were the hope and the joy which these two holy popes had received as a gift from the risen Lord and which they in turn bestowed in abundance upon the People of God, meriting our eternal gratitude.

This hope and this joy were palpable in the earliest community of believers, in Jerusalem, as we read in the Acts of the Apostles (cf. 2:42-47). It was a community which lived the heart of the Gospel, love and mercy, in simplicity and fraternity.

This is also the image of the Church which the Second Vatican Council set before us. Saint John XXIII and Saint John Paul II cooperated with the Holy Spirit in renewing and updating the Church in keeping with her pristine features, those features which the saints have given her throughout the centuries. Let us not forget that it is the saints who give direction and growth to the Church. In convening the Council, Saint John XXIII showed an exquisite openness to the Holy Spirit. He let himself be led and he was for the Church a pastor, a servant-leader. This was his great service to the Church; he was the pope of openness to the Holy Spirit.

In his own service to the People of God, Saint John Paul II was the pope of the family. He himself once said that he wanted to be remembered as the pope of the family. I am particularly happy to point this out as we are in the process of journeying with families towards the Synod on the family. It is surely a journey which, from his place in heaven, he guides and sustains.

May these two new saints and shepherds of God’s people intercede for the Church, so that during this two-year journey toward the Synod she may be open to the Holy Spirit in pastoral service to the family. May both of them teach us not to be scandalized by the wounds of Christ and to enter ever more deeply into the mystery of divine mercy, which always hopes and always forgives, because it always loves.

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